Easily find inefficient queries with QueryTrace

Nathaniel Talbott of test/unit fame has just released a new plugin he calls QueryTrace. I’ll let him explain what it does:


It’s nice that ActiveRecord logs the queries that are performed when your actions are executed, since it makes it easy to see when you have serious inefficiencies in your application. The next question, though, is always, “OK, so where are those being run from?

A gentle reminder about pluralizations

Watching the RSS feed from the Ruby on Rails trac is a great way to keep up on what’s happening in Rails development. If you’re doing any development on the Ruby on Rails project it’s required reading. Even if you just are using Rails for a web app, it’s useful to keep up on what bugs people are reporting.

Lately I’ve noticed a slew of bugs being opened against the Inflector, the class in Rails that transforms words from one form to another: singular to plural, classname to tablename, etc. The bugs all complain that Inflector is getting a pluralization or singularization wrong. But this isn’t a bug in Inflector, it is just an inherent limitation of how it works. But fear not, there is a better solution than opening a bug against the Inflector.

I guess this has been a constant thing over the history of Rails, but since it’s still going on, it deserves a rehash.

Welcome Josh Susser to the Rails weblog

You may already know Josh Susser from his excellent blog has_many :through. After linking up 5 of his posts in a row we figured it would be easier to cut out the middle man so we’ve brought him on board to be one of the contributors to the Rails weblog.

Rails weblog readers this is Josh, Josh the readers of the Rails weblog…

Silicon Valley Ruby on Rails group forming

For those of you in the Silicon Valley, Zachary Taylor and others are starting up a Ruby on Rails group and are looking for people interested in joining in. They don’t have any set dates for the first meeting, but are aiming for a get together in the coming weeks. If you are interested, get involved.

If you are closer to San Francisco proper, you should know that they already have a group setup. The SF Ruby Meetup has regular meetings on the 2nd Tuesday of the month.

Rails Recipes is out of beta

Chad Fowler’s excellent Rails Recipes, quickly becoming the de facto companion to the canonical Agile Web Development with Rails, is out of beta and off to the printers. Now that you, the community, put it through its beta paces, it’s been cleaned up and deemed ready for prime time. If you’ve been holding off til now, your time has come: order it here.

For those who couldn’t wait and jumped on board during the beta, you can get a free update here.

A big thanks to Chad for the months of work he’s put into this.

UPDATE: Chad shares his take on What Makes a Good Recipe Book.

JRuby runs a simple Rails application

The chaps at the JRuby project has been making rapid progress in anticipation of JavaOne. They finally got a simple, but complete Rails application running. I hear it’s not breaking any speed records, but it’s a great first step regardless. This should bring comfort to any developers stuck in large, mono-culture organizations that mandate the JVM as its sole alter. JRuby is a great way to sneak Rails in the backdoor.

Deploying Rails on Windows servers

Most Rails applications are deployed in a Unix server environment. Tools like Capistrano make this dead easy. For those working in a Windows environment, deployment can get considerably harder. The good news is that it’s still possible and just got a lot easier.

Brian Hogan has developed a series of articles with instructions for various methods of deploying Rails applications in a Windows server environment. Broken up across four articles, the topics covered are as follows:

Cheers to Brian for sharing the fruits of his labor.

Laying Tracks: How to Contribute to Rails

Josh Susser is at it again. He’s whiped up a PDF presentation called Laying Tracks which details the hows and the whys of contributing patches to Rails.

At just 16 slides, it’s short but meaty. He sums up the patch making and contributing workflow succinctly. This should be required reading for anyone looking to submit code to Rails core.

Documentation push

We’ve recently decided to put some work into Rails documentation. We’d like to flesh out the existing docs, add documentation for the corners that are lacking and update what may have gone stale.

Kevin Clark is leading up this campaign and would like to get the help of the community at large.

He’s got a write up that goes over how you can help Documenting Rails . It summarizes what we are looking for and gives basic instructions to get those who are interested in helping up and running. The main guidelines are:

  • Write to teach
  • Provide examples
  • Don’t restate the obvious

Good documentation patches are right up there with good code patches. If you’d like to help out Rails while gaining a deeper understanding of how it works, taking part in this documentation project would be a great start.