Get 10-15% more performance with MySQL/Rails

Rails 0.14.x and forward contains a hefty performance increase for the MySQL adapter, but it requires that you have the latest version of the underlying, native bindings (2.7). On Stephan Kaes’ benchmark suite, the upgrade is 10-15%:

You can get the latest MySQL bindings with gem install mysql (or gem install mysql -- --include=/usr/local/lib on OS X). The additional speed upgrade will automatically kick in as soon as you have the latest bindings (to check, open the console, require ‘mysql’, puts Mysql::VERSION, and expect to see 20700).

UPDATE: If you’re on Windows, Justin Rudd went through the trouble of describing how to make it work there.

Don't be so arrogant

Some times you just need an outside opinion to achieve true clarity of vision. Thankfully, there’s always such an angel available when you need it the most:

Rails shows some promise but much, much more is needed. Sorry to say this but you need stored procedure support (I know that’s a sensitive subject), less coupling with the data schema, data-aware tags in XML format and more people to knock out serious bugs.

Don’t be so arrogant.

Thanks, Pearson. I don’t know how I could have somehow missed these essential features for so long. I mean, how can we expect to be taken serious before we have data-aware tags in XML format? And what is up with all that coupling with the data schema?!

Actually, I don’t think we can get that 1.0 out the door now. With this renewed vision for the true frontiers for Rails, I think we need at least a few months in the shop yet. Of course, we’ll use that time to get all those people to knock out our serious bugs.

This is indeed all for the best.

Refactoring Rails is coming soon

Refactoring Rails is a new site in the making by Jeremy Voorhis and Robby Russell that’ll focus on how you can make sure that “…your code is for a human first and a computer second”. Signup to be notified on launch.

Themes, migrations, graphs, and alternate routes

A bunch of good articles on various Rails-related topics lately:

Tracking plugins temporarily on the wiki

One of the more exciting new community features in Rails 0.14 is the plugin system. It drastically lowers the barrier for people that wants to distribute their changes to the framework and for those that want to use said changes. But we haven’t yet arrived at a conclusion on how to track and aggregate these plugins, so far now the good ol’ wiki will do. Checkout the Plugins page on the Rails wiki.