Google Summer of Code 2014

We're pleased to announce, Ruby on Rails has been accepted into Google Summer of Code 2014 as a mentoring organization. What does this mean to you? Potentially, if you're the right person, you can get paid to work on Rails this summer! The "right person" in this case is one who is at least 18 years old (sorry, Google's rule, not ours!) on or before April 21, 2014; a full or part-time college student; and passionate about improving Rails.

We're building a potential list of project ideas on a GitHub wiki, but we welcome other interesting proposals. If your proposal gets accepted, Google will pay you $5500 over the course of three months to work on the code. If you're interested, head over to the GSoC site and start reading about the process. Student applications can be submitted starting March 10 and the deadline is March 21.

If you're wondering what's involved in becoming a GSoC student then the Google Student Guide has all the details on what's expected and what you will gain from taking part. Any further questions can be directed either to the mailing list or to me directly.

What if you're not a student? You can still help out by discussing ideas on the special mailing list we've setup for this year's program. Or if you've got previous experience of contributing to Rails and are ready to make a strong commitment to help out the next generation of developers, you can apply to be a mentor.

We're looking forward to working with this year's students, and expecting some outstanding contributions to Rails as a result!

Google Summer of Code 2013

We're pleased to announce, Ruby on Rails has been accepted into Google Summer of Code 2013 as a mentoring organization. What does this mean to you? Potentially, if you're the right person, you can get paid to work on Rails this summer! The "right person" in this case is one who is at least 18 years old (sorry, Google's rule, not ours!) on or before May 27, 2013; a full or part-time college student; and passionate about improving Rails.

We're building a potential list of project ideas on a GitHub wiki, but we welcome other interesting proposals. If your proposal gets accepted, Google will pay you $5000 over the course of three months to work on the code. If you're interested, head over to the GSoC site and start reading about the process. Student applications can be submitted starting April 22 and the deadline is May 3.

If you're wondering what's involved in becoming a GSoC student then the Google Student Guide has all the details on what's expected and what you will gain from taking part. Any further questions can be directed either to the mailing list or to me directly.

What if you're not a student? You can still help out by discussing ideas on the special mailing list we've setup for this year's program. Or if you've got previous experience of contributing to Rails and are ready to make a strong commitment to help out the next generation of developers, you can apply to be a mentor.

We're looking forward to working with this year's students, and expecting some outstanding contributions to Rails as a result!

Get Paid to Work on Rails

Last year, as you may recall, Rails got thread safety and a new core committer thanks to our participation in the Google Summer of Code program under the auspices of Ruby Central. This year, we’re pleased to announce, Ruby on Rails has been accepted into Google Summer of Code as a sponsoring organization in its own right.

What does this mean to you? Potentially, if you’re the right person, you can get paid to work on the Rails core code this summer!

The “right person” in this case is one who is at least 18 years old (sorry, Google’s rule, not ours!), a full- or part-time college student, and passionate about improving Rails. We’re building a potential list of project ideas on the Rails wiki, but we welcome other interesting proposals. We’re especially interested in work that meshes well with the plans for Rails 3.0, which will be in full swing by the time GSoC launches. If your proposal gets accepted, Google will pay you $4500 over the course of three months to work on the code.

If you’re interested, head over to the GSoC site and start reading about the process. Student applications can be submitted starting March 23.

What if you’re not a student? You can still help out by brainstorming ideas on the Rails wiki. Or if you’re a Rails guru and ready to make a strong commitment to help out the next generation of developers, you can apply to be a mentor.

We’re looking forward to working with this year’s students, and expecting some outstanding contributions to Rails as a result!

Working with Rails? Tell the world

Working With Rails is an attempt to index all the developers around the world working with Rails. It offers a few ways to browse the index and while the authority and popularity lists are perhaps a tad silly, I love looking at the country list. 3 programmers in Peru, 1 in Kazakhstan, and 3 in Uzbekistan. How cool is that?

Recent Rails job postings from the Job Board

We’re going to start posting a summary of recent Rails job postings from the 37signals Job Board every few weeks. All of these positions are for Rails programmers, but be sure to click through for individual listings on the additional requirements:

If you’re looking for Rails programmers, you can post a listing at the 37signals Job Board. The price is $250 for 30 days of air time.

Finding programmers and designers for Rails projects

The Signal vs Noise Job Board is a new alternative for finding good programmers and designers to work on Rails projects (among other things). It puts your job pitch in front of the tens of thousands of people reading the Signal vs Noise weblog. It comes at a price of $250 for a posting of 500 words visible for 30 days.

CNET, Fleck, and NYTimes.com are all using it to advertise developers with Ruby and Rails experience. If you’re just looking for programming positions, you can subscribe to the RSS for the programming section.

As you might have noticed from the URLs, this job site is using the new Simply Restful plugin. Our playground for RESTful living on Rails.

Jobster looking for lots of Rails developers

Jobster is buying into Rails big time. Over the next few months they are looking to hire no fewer than 10 developers. Those over in the Getting Real camp may cringe at the idea of bulking up your team so quickly, but Jobster CEO Jason Goldberg aims to keep things small and nimble:


One of the cool things we have done at jobster
(we think) is to foster small teams which take on big projects in rapid
cycles. Rails makes that possible. With 12 more devs, for instance, we
would spin up 4 significant projects.

So far Rails has indeed proven to be a great fit.


A team of three engineers tasked with prototyping a compelling consumer
product in one month. They where given complete freedom to do what they
wanted, and to build on top of whatever technology they chose. They chose
ruby on rails, completed a successful prototype that will be pushed to our
live site shortly. It was so successful that rails will be the technology
that all our new consumer features will be built on.

Maybe being on one of these teams sounds like a good fit for you. Check out what they are looking for.

i5labs pushing the limits of Rails

In November, PlanetMoon launched Infected, a first-person shooter game for Playstation Portable. The PSP game has two-pieces, one, the actual PSP game (which is C++), and a statistics reporting tool (how many kills did you get, how many people did you infect, where in the world are they). Any time someone wants to grab their stats, it kicks in the PSP Web Browser, which points to a Ruby on Rails server. The team behind this is Jason Wong’s i5labs. Jason blogs about some of the challenges of working within the constraints of PSP console.

i5labs also just finished a Zubio chair massage kiosk at the San Francisco Shopping Center. You schedule 10 or 20 minute massage sessions using a touchscreen, then swipe your credit card. The touchscreen system is implemented with Rails. Jason shares details of the code and hardware.

i5labs is also looking to hire a part time Ruby on Rails developer (who could eventually go full time). If you’re interested drop them a note at jobs@i5labs.com.

We’ve seen the limits of Rails pushed before, when Mike Clark and James Duncan Davidson mixed Rails with Cocoa with VitalSource. Anyone else using Rails outside of the traditional web context?

Two additional Rails' cores join 37signals

Sam Stephenson and Marcel Molina are no longer available for custom consulting jobs through Ionist. Both are now “made men” of the 37signals syndicate. They will certainly continue to amuse us all through projectionist, though.

That restores the 37signals part of the Rails core to 1/3. Still down from 1/1 in January and 1/2 before going to a counsel of 12. But once again respectable ;)

Marcel Molina and Sam Stephenson forms Ionist

Marcel Molina and Sam Stephenson are both core developers of Rails and has been riding the express since the very first release of the framework. In that time, they’ve delivered countless Rails applications and of course contributed to the framework with both code, documentation, and spirit.

Ionist is their new company specializing in Ruby on Rails consulting and application development. If you’re looking to get a whole project done for you in Rails or already have a team that just needs some expert guidance, these guys are exactly what you’ve been looking for.

They’re currently accepting new projects, so hurry up. They blog at project.ion.ist.

Ruby on Rails making inroads in corporate America

Bank of America must surely be the archetypical corporate America company. The kind that puts the e, n, t, e, r, p, r, i, s, and e in Enterprise. Ruby on Rails is on their radar. An innocent job posting from Monster.com lists “Ruby (on Rails)” as a “Nice to Have”. Not too shabby, cabby. The technology adoptive curve is certainly getting compressed. The jump from early adopter to mainstream is growing shorter.

Two more Rails jobs: C3 MediaGroup, Sprout

Another set of companies looking to hook up with Rails developers:

  • C3 MediaGroup: Looking for e-commerce web app development and OOP/Ruby/Rails experience to develop an ecommerce component for our site using Rails.
  • Sprout: Start-up looking to hire a Rails developer for building their email-handling-for-small-companies app.

Three new Rails jobs: NetworkChemistry, IntegralNet, Mirak

The commercial interest for using Rails is ever growing and I keep getting leads on new jobs. Here are the latest three openings:

  • NetworkChemistry: Looking for a Rails programmer with a C/C++ background and at least one successfully delivered Rails application for their Wireless Intrusion Prevention product in San Francisco.
  • IntegralNet Marketing: Looking for an experienced Ruby/Rails developer with J2EE knowledge for eXtreme Programming work in Orange County, CA.
  • Mirak: Looking for a Rails developer with several projects completed and patches made against the source to work on an online community knowledge system in Toronto, Canada (working remote equally fine).

David Siegel wants to build his film app in Rails

David Siegel has been working on an interesting database for the structure of films:

Some people know me as a type designer, a web designer, an entrepreneur, author, or public speaker. Few people know that for the past 20 years i’ve been working on building a database of story structure information taken from popular Hollywood films. I now have an assistant, Kevin, and together we are cranking out the data. It’s a lot of work. Each film has a potential 3,000 data items associated with it. In the past two years, we have managed to complete 100 films. We are rolling now and hope to have 200 by the end of this 2005. We do all the data gathering in excel.

He’s looking to team up with one or more Railers on either pay or barter basis:

I am looking for people to help. I want to put the project on the right footing (i.e., Ruby on Rails) and work with good people to realize it. I am willing to pay, but I would love to find a group that will barter with me for my user-interface and design skills. I can help with client projects and bring a lot of credibility to any team doing web development work. If you are a group of good engineers/programmers/developers with big projects and you need a partner to help with design/interface issues, this would be a very good fit.

See more at his posting for the Story Structure Project.

Odeo is hiring another Rails developer

I didn’t line them all up for this, I swear. But Rails positions are just emerging from everywhere. Today its the imminent podcasting venture know as Odeo that’s looking for another teammate:

Our main application uses Ruby on Rails, so either experience with that or the ability to learn quickly is required. However, more important requirements include: Extensive experience developing web applications, especially the back-end of high-scalability, consumer-oriented sites. Interest in joining a risky, by-the-seat-of-the-pants startup with minimal bennies, in exchange for tons of impact, minimal bureaucracy, and some decent upside potential.

More on the Odeo blog.

More Rails jobs: Adaptive Path, Check Giant

Adaptive Path is in need of some extra talent, writes Michael Buffington:

If you’re interested in a pretty aggressive project and you’re good with Ruby on Rails, drop me a line. The project will only last a couple of weeks but will be intense. We’ll expect you to develop code for our application, but also build tools that you can give away to the community at large. The schedule requires that we move quickly, so please make sure you’re able to start as early as next Monday and work hard until the end of May or thereabouts.

Check Giant, LLC, a finanial services start-up from Lake Bluff, Illinois is looking too:

Will be involved in architectural discussions and be asked to implement parts of the system. It will be important for the candidate to be able to take on a project independently and ensure its success. The ideal candidate will be fluent in Ruby as well as Rails. Experience in Javascript and CSS is desirable as is AJAX. SQL is a must, with experience in MySQL and Postgres being big pluses. Experience with Unix a must. A degree in Computer Science, Engineering or relevant experience. Write in plain text to jobs@cashnetusa.com

Rails job for Hollywood streaming application

Now don’t tell me there’s no glitz or glamour working with Rails. Tom Wolf from World of Wonder is looking to hire a Rails programmer to build a video delivery system in Ruby on Rails. Straight out of Hollywood:

We are looking for a freelance developer who can help us with a large web project involving video delivery, user accounts, content management and online purchasing.

The developer should have experience building modern, scalable and manageable web applications with ruby. Experience with quicktime streaming sever a plus.

The project is in its initial stages of design, so this is an opportunity for you to put your own ideas into action. Please send an email to twolf@worldofwonder.net for more information.

Three open Rails positions

It’s a great time to have skills with Ruby on Rails. People are dying to hire you:

  • Illanti Industries: Canadian Development company looking for a junior-intermediate RoR developer (read: inexpensive) to work on some small applications with us. Good change to experiment and have fun, with plenty of projects coming in the near future. For more information, contact: public@illanti.com
  • Unknown: We’re looking for a developer with significant rails and Javascript experience for a contract project. The fundamentals of the project are relatively straightforward; we’d like to build a working foundation quickly, and then go forwards from there. We’re looking for someone with very strong web application UI and client-side Javascript development skills. Please contact Adam Marsh — adamjmarsh at yahoo.com

Hiring a Rails developer for northern Germany

Norman Timmler from inlet media e.K. is looking for a Rails developer in northern Germany:

I’m starting a another project for one of my customers and need some
qualified RoR assistance. If you are interested, you should have done an entire Rails project. The user interface will need some nice ajax tricks, so Javascript shouldn’t be a foreign language.

The project is quite interesting and will probably drive Rails to it’s limits. I can’t tell more at this point, but be sure it is no boring thing!

See more in Norman’s posting on the mailing list.

Hiring a Rails developer for Brisbane, Australia

Dan Sketcher from Tangelix is looking for a Rails developer to help them build a book engine down under:

We’re looking for someone in Brisbane, Australia who’s keen on Rails and has a bit of experience with it, along with PostgreSQL, XML, and general web programming. We’ve got a booking engine to build – which we’ve had experience with before. It’s not simple, but it’s a known domain with a solid user requirements spec and sitemap that will be agreed upon before commencement. No graphical skills are needed, we just need the business logic to drive it. An onsite coder is preferred, but the right person would be alright to work remotely. It’s anticipated that there will be a team of two developers, one of which is me :) If it all sounds good, send your resume to jobs at tangelix dot com.

Rails job in Columbus, Ohio

Just spotted this mighty brief posting for a Rails position in Columbus, Ohio on craigslist and thought I’d pass it along. It’s never been a better time to jump on something fresh and expect to actually find work doing it. We have a wide array of independent consultants working exclusively in Rails already and more are joining all the time. Be part of it.

Another Rails consultant breaks out on his own

Congratulations to Scott Barron for pursuing the life of the independent consultant. Especially so, of course, because he’ll be doing it as a Ruby on Rails specialist. We already have a good handful of people following that round with great success. People like Tobias Luekte and Jeremy Kemper are overloaded with requests for work.

So basically, we need more warm bodies to follow up on all the leads we’re seeing. Now is definitely a good time to build a name for yourself in the Rails world and start staking your claim to the many opportunities bubbling up.

The best way to demonstrate your skills as a Ruby on Rails consultant worth his salt is to get intimate with the source, start contributing patches (we have lots of faults to hunt down if you need an easy way in), and create a fully functional showcase application.

Scott is doing Elite Journal, Scratch, Recipe Box, and Elite Album. Tobias is cooking with Hieraki and Typo. Sam is behind the Javascript-engine Prototype for the new Ajax stuff.

In other words, it’s a brave new world of opportunities. The streets a covered with gold and honey is raining from the sky. Fortune and fame awaits. If we had the tech for it, there would be a flying billboard saying:

A new life awaits you in the off-world colonies. The chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure

The time is now!

(How’s that for an enthusiastic rally cry)

Rails developer with Java chops wanted

Jason Wong from ionami in San Francisco wants to hire a Rails developer with Java chops to help him through the transition from Java to Ruby on Rails:

ionami is looking for one part time (20 hrs/week) with a migration to full time work, for a maintenance and development position. Here’s the catch. You have to know Java really well, and know your way around Oracle. Additionally, XML, XSLT, and JS would be helpful. Our client is expanding, and the work is heavy Java, but I’m also migrating the rest of our shop work to Ruby on Rails, where possible. We just acquired our first Fortune 500 Rails customer. So if you have Java chops, and want to do Rails work, send a resume to jobs at ionami dot com.

Commercial training in Rails

Tobias Luekte has had great success introducing newcomers to Rails. He provides tutoring sessions with hand-holding, sing-alongs, and all that good stuff that makes you really get what’s going on much, much faster than picking everything up on your own. He’s now offering this service to the public at large, so if you just got into Rails and want to purchase some focused training to help you get up to speed faster, Tobias is your man.

A few quotes from people how has had the pleasure so far:

“Tobias’ deep knowledge of the entire Rails system is what finally gave my company the confidence to go ahead with this project. His wisdom and insight into such things as database setup helped immensely. He has a great way of walking through real-world situations instead of merely abstract or simplistic scholastic examples.”
— Derek Sivers, www.cdbaby.com

“Tobias’ support and mentoring has been invaluable — why spend a few hours hacking away with trial-and-error code when someone with real experience can solve the problem and clearly explain it to me in a fraction of the time?”
— Justin French, Indent.com.au

The training can even be performed remote using VNC and Skype/phone. Read more at Leetsoft.

Three Ruby on Rails programmers needed in London

Sean O’Halpin is advertising on the Rails mailing list for three Ruby on Rails programmers for work in central London, UK. Here’s the short pitch:

I am looking for 3 permanent top notch Ruby developers – 2 senior and 1 intermediate – to work in central London, UK. I head up a small group of programmers who produce business applications in-house for a large communications agency in the advertising market. Demand for our services is growing so we need to expand our team.

The requirements for the two senior positions are:

The senior programmers need 5+ years experience in a variety of languages and platforms dealing with the full project lifecycle in a variety of domains. You will be expected to gather requirements, design systems and manage a project from start to finish. You will report to me, the System Architect.

…and for the intermediate position:

The intermediate programmer will be reporting to one of the seniors and should have 3+ years experience and be confident in team leading and administrative skills. Your role will be to support the seniors and to be sysadmin for the team.

Exciting stuff. Read the full thing on the mailing list and get in contact with Sean if you’re interested.

Joe Agliozzo is looking for a Rails developer

Joe Agliozzo is looking to hire a Rails developer for a freelance project to work on an application that will “…allow users to post local restaurants, shops, attractions etc. to the database along with reviews and ‘star’ ratings. Comments and additions to the posts by users will also be allowed.” Sounds like a fun community project.

Here’s what he’s looking for in a developer:

The developer hired wll be provided with wire frame layouts of all pages, and a feature set summary will also be provided. Architecture of the db and programming is left to the discretion of the programmer. There will be as little “reinventing the wheel” as possible. I intend to use industry standard interfaces, etc.. such as Amazon.com uses in posting book reviews. Please include at least one example of similar site you have done in Ruby already.

Sounds interesting to you? Get in touch with Joe at joeag [at] gte [dot] net as soon as possible.

BARRA seeks Rails developer

MSCI Barra is looking for a developer that preferably is already up-to-speed with Ruby on Rails or at least interested in getting it. It’s pretty darn cool to see a company like Barra list Ruby as a required skill and Rails as a preferred one.

The short bio on Barra:

Join BARRA, the world’s leading provider of analytical investment and trading solutions. Our products are used by many of the most prestigious investment institutions in today’s exciting global financial markets to determine investment strategies. More than 2500 organizations worldwide rely on BARRA’s unique combination of risk management software, value-added information and consulting as an integral part of their investment process.

The job posting was made to craigslist’s San Francisco East Bay Area listing, so I expect its primarily targeting locales in that area.

Programmer needed for JSP to Rails conversion

Gately’s would like to dump their JSP-powered shop and upgrade to Rails. They’re looking for Rails talent to help them do just that:

We need a developer who is proficient in (and hates) JSP for a contract-to-hire position which would involve replacing a JSP app with a Rails app for a growing e-tailer in the Denver, CO area. Would prefer local talent, but would consider teleworkers from anywhere with the right skills. Please contact me (Solomon White, solo [at] gatelys [dotcom]) if you feel you might be a fit.

Jamis Buck is working on Basecamp

Along with the announcement of the latest major upgrade to Basecamp, I’ve unveiled who the mysterious programmer we’ve brought on at 37signals is. So I thought I’d also wish him a warm welcome on landing a Rails-based job from the Rails weblog.

Congratulations on landing a contract working with Rails, Jamis Buck :)

You may recognize the name from his many contributions to the Ruby community. Most recently, the SQLite3 bindings that’s taking the dream of self-contained Rails applications a big step closer to reality.

UPDATE: Jamis shares a few more details.

Using the Rails to impress potential employers

Drew McLellan is looking for a job and what better way to demonstrate to potential employers than to show you’re keeping up with the field of web development:

I like to work on the edge and am frequently updating my skills. Right now I’m learning Ruby with the aim of doing some work using the Rails framework in the near future. Learning new things opens your mind to possibilities, and more possibilities lead to better solutions.

With jobs being outsourced left and right, perhaps its also time for you to demonstrate why you’re not just yet another mainstream developer chasing the same Java, .NET, or PHP jobs as everyone else. Stand out from the crowd.

Available for hire?

I’m regularly getting requests from people who wants to start up Rails development, but are looking for a way to kick-start the affair by retaining one or more experts. Some make good candidates for referring to the firms listing themselves on the Commercial Support page while others are looking to hire developers into their team on either a contract or full-time basis.

It’s for the latter scenario that I’ve started the Available for Hire page on the wiki. If you’re a single developer looking for work with Ruby, please do add yourself to that page if you feel your skill set is at a level where you could consider yourself “capable” with Rails.

Defining “capable” is always hard, but you should probably at least have made significant contributions to the framework and/or have one or more Rails projects under your belt. Such a project can very well be a demo application, though. It needs not be commercial work.